Napier University Lecturer Showcases Cutting Edge Drumkit

Thursday, 02 October 2008

A lecturer from Napier University, Edinburgh, has created an electronic drum kit which could revolutionise live dance music sets.

Bryden Stillie from the Department of Creative Industries has used a selection of Roland technology to build the super-kit which can create the type of sounds you would usually need a whole band to generate.

The kit uses £4,500 worth of cutting-edge technology which can potentially control 140 different sounds at any one time – it boasts an incredible six bass pedals, one hi-hat pedal, three trigger modules containing numerous trigger pads, and a mixer. The pedals are used to create drum and bass sounds whilst the trigger pads play individual music notes.

Bryden said: “The sound result you get from this kit is astonishing – there are similar kits around which rely on playing sound loops, but on this kit you have to play every single individual sound yourself. It really pushes the boundaries of co-ordination and demands that you are really fluent with your feet!

“But once you’ve mastered it, you could play, for example, an entire Chemical Brothers-style dance tune on your own without a backing band or relying on samples. You get a really raw sound and could play a really impressive solo gig with this kit.”

Bryden – who has been electronic drumming since the age of 12 and now drums in a band as well as playing regular solo electronic gigs and DJ sets – now hopes to get endorsement from Roland for creating the amazing kit with the company’s technology.

ENDS
Notes to editors –
About Napier University:
Napier is a friendly, lively, modern University, with campuses conveniently located around south central Edinburgh – one of the UK’s most student-friendly cities.

Napier offers over 200 undergraduate and post graduate courses and has over 14,000 students from over 80 countries and was voted number one for Graduate Employability in Scotland (HESA 2008) and the number one modern university in Scotland – The Guardian University Guide (published in May 2008).

 

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