New Partnership Offers Golden Opportunity For Documentary Makers

Tuesday, 07 September 2010

The National Library of Scotland, home to the Scottish Screen Archive, has developed a partnership with EDINDOCS, Edinburgh's new documentary film festival, and will provide two documentary makers with a unique opportunity.


EDINDOCS aims to bring quality independent film to Scotland's capital, showcasing fresh new talent in a city renowned for its culture by screening 25 of the finest new documentaries during its debut three day festival this month.


As the official sponsor of the 'Best Documentary' category, the Library is supporting a fantastic prize for the top two documentaries (short and feature-length) - the films will be given pride of place in the prestigious Scottish Screen Archive to be accessed in perpetuity.


Furthermore, the award-winning films will be shown on public screens in the National Library's George IV Bridge building in Edinburgh for an entire week, and the documentary makers will receive £250.


Martyn Wade, National Librarian and CEO of the National Library of Scotland, said: "We are delighted to help promote the art of documentary-making through our sponsorship of EDINDOCS.


"I'm sure any documentary-maker would be delighted with the opportunity to see their film join Scotland's national moving images collection, the Scottish Screen Archive. We are looking forward to seeing the winning contributions."


Stuart McInnes, organiser of EDINDOCS, said there were surprisingly few opportunities for aspiring documentary-makers - particularly independents - to showcase their work, and hopes the festival will help to open doors for them.


He said: "EDINDOCS is not exclusively for independent filmmakers but it does provide a new platform for them, which they desperately need.


"The creative environment provided by Edinburgh's festivals is fantastic and we hope that EDINDOCS can further complement that by opening doors for the wealth of new documentary filmmaking talent out there."


EDINDOCS takes place from September 16th-18th at The Church Hill Theatre, Morningside, Edinburgh. For more information visit 




Notes to Editors:


About the Scottish Screen Archive:

The SSA was set up in 1976 and houses more than 32,000 films and videos presenting over 100 years of Scotland's history. The archive also plays a vital role in the preservation of film, restoring old and damaged footage and making it available online. For further information visit

About the National Library of Scotland

  • 1 The National Library of Scotland is a major European research library and is the world's leading centre for the study of Scotland and the Scots - an information treasure trove for Scotland's knowledge, history and culture.
  • 2 The Library's collections are of world-class importance. Key areas include rare books, manuscripts, maps, music, official publications, business information, science and technology, and the modern and foreign collections.
  • 3 The Library holds well over 14 million items, including printed items, approximately 100,000 manuscripts, over 32,000 films and nearly 2 million maps. Every week it collects approximately 6,000 new items via Legal Deposit.
  • 4 See for further information about the Library and its collections, and for information on events being held at the Library please see