SKFF funds brand new machinery for hospital

Tuesday, 12 February 2013

THE Sick Kids Friends Foundation (SKFF) has funded a staggering £94,000 to purchase two brand new state-of-the-art ultrasound machines for theEdinburghRoyalHospitalfor Sick Children.

The new machines have been delivered to the hospital and were officially unveiled by paediatric surgeon Dr Maeve McPhillips yesterday (Monday, February 11). The new equipment will help improve care for sick children across the East of Scotland and beyond.

The new ultrasound machines will replace the equipment which was funded by SKFF back in 2000, providing much clearer and more precise imaging for gastroenterology, neurology, oncology, orthopaedics, A&E and general surgery – with more than 5,700 such examinations taking place at the hospital every year.

The Foundation campaigned to purchase two new pieces of equipment to allow one to be used as a mobile scanner which can be taken to children on the wards if they are too ill to go to the radiology department for their examinations.

One young patient who has used the older equipment and understands the importance of the ultrasound machine and all of the good work and innovations provided by the SKFF is Laura Gibson.

The 17-year-old from Colinton, Edinburgh, was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in 2011, which is a type of cancer originating from white blood cells called lymphocytes.

Laura was treated at theRoyalHospitalfor Sick Children, undergoing six cycles of chemotherapy over a six month period between March and August 2011. The following month the brave teenager underwent 11 sessions of radiotherapy in 11 days.

She said: “Going through all of the treatment needed to make me better was really difficult but I am truly grateful for all the funds invested by the Sick Kids Friends Foundation. The ultrasound machine used during my treatment really helped staff in radiotherapy track the progress of the chemotherapy.

“I’m delighted that the Foundation has been able to fund and purchase two brand new machines for the hospital because they are such invaluable pieces of equipment to have – and I think it’s especially good that one of them will be a mobile scanner because there are times when some of the children are just too sick and weak to get out of bed and make it along to the radiotherapy department.

“I am so grateful to everyone at the hospital for everything they did for me. I sat one of my exams in hospital when I was ill and did really well. Since then I’ve been taking part in cheerleading and I’m loving life.”

Throughout her illness, Laura, like many of the patients at theRoyalHospitalfor Sick Children, benefited from the use of the ultrasound machine which helped diagnose and monitor the recovery process to ensure treatment was on track. Any problems could be identified – and now the new equipment will make that pinpointing even better and clearer.

Maureen Harrison, chief executive of the Sick Kids Friends Foundation, said: “I’m so delighted that the new machines have arrived and are ready to be used straight away. They are going to make a massive contribution to the extra care received by our patients.

“It’s a great thing to see the young people in the hospital directly benefiting from all of our fundraising and investment and I am looking forward to hearing the many success stories that our new equipment will bring.”

Dr McPhillips said: “These machines are the latest in ultrasound technology and deliver significant improvements in the clarity and precision of the scan images. Upgrading to this equipment ensures that we can continue to provide high quality care for our young patients and we are delighted that the Sick Kids Friends Foundation has purchased these vital pieces of kit to help us do that.”



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Issued by Beattie Communications on behalf of the Sick Kids Friends Foundation



The Sick Kids Friends Foundation helps sick children get better by funding extra medical equipment, improving facilities, financing specialised research and training and providing a wide variety of extra comforts for young patients and their families at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, other health centres in the East of Scotland and in the Community. For more information please visit